www.storymania.com
Storymania Logo

 

 

Essays




Did Ya? by Matt Tracy I wonder if anyone ever thought of any of the stuff I propose? [597 words]
Turning Fifty by Danny I. Spitler The author takes a reflective look at reaching the half century mark. [999 words]
The Morning Shower by Danny I. Spitler Does anyone else suffer these issues associated with the morning shower? [940 words]
Stranger To Myself by Omar Longoria ďLook in the mirror. The face that pins you with its double gaze reveals a chastening secre... [1,225 words]
A Thanksgiving Monday by Danny I. Spitler The author has a reflective and enlightening evening following Thanksgiving. [809 words]
The Vaporeal Defecation Of A Mental Diarrheatic by Crazy Clown I just had so much fun writing the other two displays of inanit... [951 words]
The Unfortunate Homophobe by Crazy Clown An interspective on a homophobe who wishes he wasn't, and some ideas and opinions on ... [1,131 words]
The Demented Monologue Of A Downright Imbecile by Crazy Clown Another display of foolishness and inanity, from the one who can... [1,246 words]
The Bed by Danny I. Spitler The author gains appreciation for the consistency brought to his life by an inanimate object [791 words]
She's Just Relaxing by Danny I. Spitler She's just relaxing on the sofa; however..... [626 words]
Fathers And Sons And Baseball by Danny I. Spitler Three generations share an uniquely American experience. Opening Day. [1,078 words]
Well, Shit by Crazy Clown A rather... interesting essay on the worlds worst waste. Requires a unique state of mind to enjoy pr... [1,020 words]
Swimming With Sharks by Danny I. Spitler The author experiences an encounter with a large Lemon Shark in Tahiti [835 words]
Some Explanation Is In Order by Crazy Clown You might come to this title expecting a deep, philosophical, or thought-provoking... [447 words]
Ramblings Of A Crazy Dude by Michael Hunter hee hee. I can write whatever I want in here! bwa ha. Unfortunately, I can't thi... [629 words]
My Dog Opposes Communism by Tcn Actually submitted to a high school teacher. I guess I was feeling like a rebel at the... [862 words]
Free Food by Danny I. Spitler There's no such thing as a free lunch. Wrong. There is tons of free food, as this author points out.... [1,031 words]
Dragonball Z - Akira Toryama's Drug Trip? by Crazy Clown An essay worthy of the label of Crazy Clown, about the sheer ludicrou... [989 words]
A Place I'd Like To Forget by Tcn Another school piece. Writing about a grocery store job I held during the summer. I ... [898 words]
It's Wednesday by Danny I. Spitler The author reflects on his lover. [143 words]
Bruce Willis: One Of The Sexiest Men Alive by L Chapman - [176 words]
American Tale
Screw Common Sense by Michael Hunter It's a college essay thingy. I was just reading some sample essays and got an urge to write... [993 words]
Food Stamp Day by L Chapman - [247 words]
Cellular Consciousness: From Quantum Physics To Alternative Medicine by Lissa N Metz-Gomez A research paper linking quantum physics ... [1,660 words]
Why Do Some People Learn A Foreign Language So Easily Whereas Others Find It So Difficult? by J. Rodegheri Have you ever felt ... [2,257 words]
Think Before You Write by Richard Koss My observations, after reading the work of many aspiring young writers, prompted me to w... [988 words]
After The Rain - How The West Lost The East by Sam Vaknin An anthology of 180 previously published articles and essays regard... [11,318 words]
Philosophical Musings by Sam Vaknin More than 150 essays about various topics in current philosophy. The main emphases are on... [10,353 words]
Malignant Self Love - Narcissism Revisited by Sam Vaknin The Narcissistic Personality Disorder and Pathological Narcissism De... [5,066 words]
The Value Of Material Things by Jennifer Nobile Raymond This was an essay I entered for a contest in Ladie's Home Journal. [749 words]
Lime's Diary Of Madness by Lime a true story [782 words]
Whispering To Death by Lewd Muse Not quite sure why I wrote this. I just let my muse take control and saw what happened. E... [279 words]
The Lost Generation by Julia Riffle A short essay. [789 words]
The Debate Goes On by Clark G Curtis This is a personal look at the wonderful world of boxer shorts and jockey underwear and why ... [1,507 words]
On Art (II) - The Response Of The True And Artificial Artists To Inspiration by Erik The second of my essays on art. H... [1,058 words]
On Art (I) - The True Vs. The Artificial Artist by Erik This is the first of a collection in the making on my views abo... [1,373 words]
Getting A Free Lunch On Bay Street by Howard Freedman This is about freeloaders and annual corporate meetings... They ain't there... [756 words]
Colombia by Iveth Jaramillo A DEEP SELF-ANALYSIS OF A CHILD'S FEELINGS. [370 words]
No To The Death Penalty by Alejandro Dubois Arrese This is an essay saying why the death penalty should be illegalized in the United State... [314 words]
Adoptions by Juliana Carrillo An essay. [678 words]
Qualities Of The Perfect Teacher by Laura Mťndez This is just kind of a personal essay of what I think are the qualities of the... [449 words]
Life by Carolina Arango - [591 words]
Global Vision by Iveth Jaramillo What I think all of us look like. [333 words]
Friends Are Forever by Adriana Garcia An essay. [991 words]
Poem Analysis by Ana Lucia Mora An essay. [807 words]
Cloning by Federico Rivera Burrowes An essay. [651 words]
An Education Problem by Juan Jose Duran Talks about how important it is to educate children. [317 words]
Rocky by Ana Torres - [436 words]
Evil Vs. Goodness by David Valencia - [217 words]
Jewels Of Joy - Life's Little Glories by Abigail I Copuyoc - [468 words]
Freedom by Maria Camila Bernal An essay. [786 words]
A Tour Through Colombia by Juliana Carrillo - [425 words]
Ironic by Juliana Carrillo - [1,456 words]
Songs From My Attic by Steven R. Kravsow While rummaging through my attic, I discovered a box of old sheet music from the turn of th... [1,878 words]
Pride by Erik This is the first of what is intended to be a collection of essays revolving around the Seven Deadly Sins... [1,469 words]
A Dream by Lawrence Vaduva Sometimes dreams are so close to reality it's hard to tell the difference.... [1,005 words]
Intolerance by Erik This is an essay about intolerance, prejudice, and other mad things which should not exist in socie... [1,525 words]
The Girlfriend Before I Lost My Virginity by Jimmy Hap This is a short Essay dedicated to the last innocent realationship an... [483 words]
Remembering Jamie by Jennifer L O'callaghan Thoughts following the unexpected death of an old friend [793 words]
Dragons, A Collection by Gary Bolstridge Dragons - The belief in dreams and inspiration must be encouraged in everyone. [231 words]
Paths To Take, Decisions To Make by A C Christine An essay about deciding on life's many trying ways that can confuse and astoun... [209 words]
Coffee With a Side of Greatness
A Slice of Hope
Saying Goodbye...
...Arawak Language
Hibiscus
Suomi (Finland)
Cuban Wall
The Child That I (Never) Knew
Thoughts on Mothers
Oh Canada

Go to page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11]
TITLE (EDIT)
American Tale
DESCRIPTION
"I stood behind the old man in the check-out line at the local convenience store. A navy blue Yankees hat covered a head of sparse gray hair. He carried an old framed photo which he proudly laid on top of his two Sunday papers as he rooted around in his pocket for the money. "See this here picture? I've had this for years. It's worth a fortune," he boasted to the Indian gentleman behind the counter. "It's Mantle, old Joe D., and Ted Williams."
[629 words]
AUTHOR
Steven R. Kravsow
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
I have been writing for the past 10 years. I have written short stories, essays, Op-Ed pieces, magazine length articles, and 3 novels entitled, "The Acorn Academy," "Boneman," and "Puppet Boy." I am presently at work on my 4th novel entitled, "Square Pegs."
[February 2000]
AUTHOR'S OTHER TITLES (13)
A Better Place To Be (Short Stories) Bennie Dean is a tiny little man with a crooked little smile who marks the passage of his day following the rituals of breakfast, lunch, and dinner at a Continuing Care Center. But do not be sad for B... [788 words]
A Place To Stay (Short Stories) Arnie Westin was a con man-- a nickle and dimer always looking for the quick score. Arnie had a plan-- genious really. But Arnie is about to discover that you don't always get what you want. [5,217 words]
Loonies (Short Stories) A car slowly gained on him. Soon it was even with Daniel's. It was a black sports model, low slung and powerful looking with black tinted glass and black sidewall tires. He looked over at the black ca... [4,959 words]
Photo Man (Non-fiction) I stood at the airport fence looking at a vintageB-24 Liberator. And then I saw the tiny little man. He wore his old Army Air Force fatigues, perfectly laundered and looking like it was still 1944. Hi... [2,560 words]
Play Ball: The Real Rite Of Spring (Essays) I love the spring. Wanna know why? Because spring is the time of year when good things begin to happen. And like anyone else, I like good things to happen. And if they happen to me, then so much the b... [917 words]
Riding The Line (Short Stories) Rosie McClusky loved to ride the bus, losing herself in the tapestry of the city. She loved the way it wound its way through the sleepy city early in the morning and she loved the way it meandered bac... [918 words]
Songs From My Attic (Essays) While rummaging through my attic, I discovered a box of old sheet music from the turn of the century. It painted a rich tapestry of who we were in the early 1900's, what we believed, and portrayed the... [1,878 words]
Stars & Stripers (Non-fiction) He was a tiny man with a scrapbook. He'd served as a reporter for Stars & Stripes during World War II. And he was one of the first inside Buchanwald. He carried his scrapbook under his arm and his sto... [1,081 words]
The Debunking The Dreaded Shopping Spree (Essays) The English language has approximately 500,000 words, and these words, in and of themselves, are quite benign.The other day that dreaded combination was uttered to me, and my life changed. I was heade... [1,715 words]
The Family Executioner (Non-fiction) In the early hours of December 11, something terrible happened. William Beadle, known to his friends and neighbors as an honest and forthright man, took an ax and hacked his wife and four children to... [4,795 words]
The Left Arm Of The Law (Short Stories) Charlie Underwood was a good cop. But sometimes even the best laid plans and a lifetime's work can disappear in the bl;inlk of an eye. And when that happens, a guy like Charlie Underwoord has to have ... [5,317 words]
The Tree House (Short Stories) When you're a kid growing up, there are always three rules you need to remember-- look both ways before crossing the road, keep your bike oiled and the tires filled, and watch out for the Shoots! Ever... [3,691 words]
Trading The Metal (Non-Fiction) "Today was a good day for me, or so I thought. I had traded in my aged 4-door Taurus, after bleeding it as dry as turnip blood on a stone. In its place stood a bright red beauty that was not only econ... [1,234 words]
American Tale
Steven R. Kravsow

I stood behind the old man in the check-out line at the local convenience store. A navy blue Yankees hat covered a head of sparse gray hair. He carried an old framed photo which he proudly laid on top of his two Sunday papers as he rooted around in his pocket for the money.

"See this here picture? Iíve had this for years. Itís worth a fortune," he boasted to the Indian gentleman behind the counter. "Itís Mantle, old Joe D., and Ted Williams."

The Indian smiled politely but only shook his head. I assumed he didnít really know who those baseball icons were. The old man picked up his papers and the photograph and headed out the door. Now it was my turn.

"You know, if that photo is the real thing, then it really is worth a lot of money," I said, making idle conversation.

The clerk looked at me. "You know, America is a strange country. Here, you save and collect thingsócars, baseball cards. I donít understand. We donít hang on to things ion my country. You make money, you put it in the bank where it is safe. You got to keep cards for 50 years, then if you spill something on them all is ruined. You can keep cars but they all break sooner or later. Yes, my friend, put money in the bank where it is safe. That is my advice to you."

I was taken aback by his comments.

"Iíll have to ponder that one," I replied lamely. I paid for my papers and left.

Perhaps we Americans collect things, hold on to things because weíve managed to be well-off enough as a country to have a period of reinforced childhood called adolescence and enough disposable income to spend on trivia.

Collecting allows us to hold on to our childhood. In his country, there is no childhood, no adolescence. The responsibilities relegated to adulthood come early. He probably began working to help his family when he was six so he has no adolescence to hold on to, no protected childhood to hold dear.

Perhaps we collect baseball cards to revisit a childhood that was free from adult pressured and expectations. Is it no wonder that despite baseball managementís stupidity, we are still drawn to the game that spoke so eloquently to us as children.

Who could not love the smell of freshly mowed grass, the sound of hot dog vendors hawking their wares, the sight of incredibly young men tossing balls, their echoes smacking the sweet spot s on wooden bats.

I attended my first baseball game back in 1958. I can still vividly recall the explosion of colors that greeted me when I walked up the runway and headed for the grandstand with my father. Thee is no green like the grass of a ballpark, no blue deeper than the sky overhead, no orange like the crushed brick that forms the warning track that circles the powder blue outfield walls covered with multicolored advertisements. I had that experience. I doubt my Indian friend had one like it when he was growing up. And every time I think of it, for just the briefest of moments, I am eleven years old again.

Yes, I could collect cars, and after a while they will surely break. I had a huge baseball card collection when I was a child. I have a small one today. I saw the old manís picture and it struck an emotional chord with me. I recognized value; not monetary value, but rather value to my soul. For as I stood behind him and looked at the youthful images of The Mick, and Joe D., and The Splendid Splinterófrozen in timeófor the briefest moment I was a child again.

And that, my friend is like money in the bank for me.

 

READER'S REVIEWS (2)
DISCLAIMER: STORYMANIA DOES NOT PROVIDE AND IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR REVIEWS. ALL REVIEWS ARE PROVIDED BY NON-ASSOCIATED VISITORS, REGARDLESS OF THE WAY THEY CALL THEMSELVES.

"Excellent! There was so much feeling behind these words. The story hit home as to how I feel, too. Keep up the great work, Steven. :o)" -- Tammy, VA.
"Once again, Steven, you prove your word wizardry with this short story....magnificent imagery and the theme is universal...what do we value and why? It is the story of life itself that gives credence to those things we hold so dear. Keep up the good work....Teresa" -- Teresa , Kentucky.

TO DELETE UNWANTED REVIEWS CLICK HERE! (SELECT "MANAGE TITLE REVIEWS" ACTION)

Submit Your Review for American Tale
Required fields are marked with (*).
Your e-mail address will not be displayed.

Your Name*     E-mail*

City     State/Province     Country

Your Review (please be constructive!)*


Please Enter Code*:

Submit Your Rating for American Tale

Worst     1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     Best

COPYRIGHT NOTICE
© 1996 Steven R. Kravsow
STORYMANIA PUBLICATION DATE
September 2000
NUMBER OF TIMES TITLE VIEWED
1851
 

Copyright © 1998-2001 Storymania Technologies Limited. All Rights Reserved.